Iron East and West Fires Behaving Very DifferentlyPrescribed Burning Near Cle Elum

first_imgHere’s the latest update on the Iron East and Iron West fires:Iron East Fire: 100 acres; 0% containmentLocation: 12 miles northeast of Cle Elum, WAStart Date: September 7, 2018Cause: Lightning Iron West Fire: 11 acres; 20% containmentLocation: 12 miles northeast of Cle Elum, WAStart Date: September 7, 2018Cause: Lightning Current Activity: The preparation continues on both fires, improving line, installing hose lays, chipping the removed brush and generally getting ready to remove fuels by ignition. During early Monday morning, the eastern fire’s containment northeast line was tested and held. Interior embers began two very small fires ahead of the main fire. The wind rapidly expanded the eastern fire indicated by its long narrow footprint. Fire crews contained these fires. They also discovered another spot outside the dozer line which quickly extinguished. The eastern fire is now approximately 100 acres. The fire is burning primarily in dry, dead and downed woody debris. These fuels retain the fire’s heat longer than twigs and grasses. In Fire Terminology these heavy fuels are known as 100 hour or 1000 hour fuels. The western fire has not grown appreciably mainly due to its location in a deep depression that the wind has little effect on. It has been slowly moving down slope. The plan today is to continue direct fireline to put the fire completely out. There will be a Type 1 Helicopter devoted to working the western fire today. Air resources were again used to cool both fires and slow progress. The fixed winged resources consisted of a VLAT (Very Large Air Tanker) and a heavy tanker. Videos of these planes in action can be seen on Iron East’s Inciweb page.Today begins a cooler and more moist weather trend for the next four days. The maximum temperatures will be in the mid-50s. This weather will allow crews to further to prep the containment lines, remove snags, and lay hose lines. The team now has the necessary number of crews and types of crews to work this fire safely. Evacuations: A Level 2 (Get Set) evacuation is in effect for approximately 12 structures in the vicinity of the Iron East Fire. Engines are actively patrolling these areas. Closures: Closures are in place for trails in the area including the West Iron and Iron Bear Trails. Road closures include Forest Service Roads 9714 and 9715/7320. Maps and information on the closure will be available on Inciweb. Smoke/Weather: Weather is expected to be cooler and more moist for the next four days. The maximum temperatures will be in the mid-50s.last_img read more

Read more…

Frequent sauna baths linked to lower stroke risk

first_img Source:https://www.uef.fi/en/-/runsas-saunominen-vahentaa-aivoinfarktin-riskia May 4 2018Frequent sauna bathing is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, according to a new international study. In a 15-year follow-up study, people taking a sauna 4-7 times a week were 61% less likely to suffer a stroke than those taking a sauna once a week. This is the first prospective large-scale study on this topic, and the findings were reported in Neurology.Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, placing a heavy human and economic burden on societies. The reduced risk associated with sauna bathing was found by a team of scientists from the Universities of Eastern Finland, Bristol, Leicester, Atlanta, Cambridge and Innsbruck.Related StoriesNew method improves detection of atrial fibrillation in stroke survivorsCalling on global community to prevent dementia by preventing strokeStem cell stimulation shows promise as potential stroke treatmentThe findings are based on the population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) study and involved 1,628 men and women aged 53 to 74 years living in the eastern part of Finland. Based on their frequency of taking traditional Finnish sauna baths (relative humidity 10-20%), the study participants were divided into three groups: those taking a sauna once a week, those taking a sauna 2-3 times a week, and those taking a sauna 4-7 times a week.The more frequently saunas were taken, the lower was the risk of stroke. Compared to people taking one sauna session per week, the risk was decreased by 14% among those with 2-3 sessions and 61% among those with 4-7 sessions. The association persisted even when taking into account conventional stroke risk factors, such as age, sex, diabetes, body mass index, blood lipids, alcohol consumption, physical activity and socio-economic status. The strength of association was similar in men and women.Previous results from the KIHD study at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that frequent sauna bathing also significantly reduces the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. According to the researchers, mechanisms driving the association of sauna bathing with reduced stroke may include a reduction in blood pressure, stimulation of immune system, a positive impact on the autonomic nervous system, and an improved cardiovascular function. In a recent experimental study, the same group of scientists also showed that sauna bathing has acute effects on the stiffness of the arterial wall, hence influencing blood pressure and cardiac function parameters.last_img read more

Read more…

Study defines molecular basis to explain connection between mothers nutrition and infant

first_img Source:https://news.ohsu.edu/2018/05/23/you-are-what-your-mother-eats?linkId=52079064 May 24 2018For years, pregnant mothers have questioned their nutritional habits: “Will eating more cause my baby to be overweight?” Or, “I’m eating for two, so it won’t hurt to have an extra serving, right?”While many factors, such as the age of the mother, overall health and genetics ultimately play a role, the correlation between a mother’s nutrition habits and metabolism has been proved to directly impact the growth of her child. And researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, believe they may be one step closer to knowing why.In a study published online in Nature Communications, the research team, led by Jae W. Lee, Ph.D., has demonstrated that two neurons key to growth and metabolism — GHRH and AgRP — are developmentally interconnected.Related StoriesTackling high sugar content in baby foodScientists discover hundreds of protein-pairs through coevolution studyNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerLocated in the hypothalamus region of the brain, within a grouping of neurons known as the arcuate nucleus, GHRH, or growth hormone-release hormone, neurons orchestrate body growth and maturation. Meanwhile, AgRP, or Agouti-related peptide, neurons stimulate feeding and suppress energy usage.To understand how these neurons are developed, the research team cataloged various proteins expressed in the arcuate nucleus of mice and analyzed their overall function.”We found that one specific protein called DLX1 is critical for GHRH neuron development. However, it also suppresses the development of the AgRP neuron,” said Lee, a professor of pediatrics in the OHSU School of Medicine and OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital. “When DLX1 was removed, the mouse’s growth was stunted, yet it appears obese.”Additionally, DLX1 was found to suppress the development of OTP-labeled cells that become AgRP neurons. This would suggest normal growth development, but limited blockage of energy use, resulting in a trim figure.”For the first time, these findings prove the intimate relationship between GHRH and AgRP neurons in developmental lineage. Further, the development of both neurons can be artificially preset in controlling postnatal growth,” Lee said.The researchers now are working to determine if DLX1 may be controlled by diet. By testing both high-fat and low-protein – or malnourished – diets in mice, Lee hopes to identify how food impacts a baby’s genetic makeup in the womb. This could scientifically support the idea that ‘you are what your mother eats.’last_img read more

Read more…

Island Fertility joins Stony Brook Community Medical to provide comprehensive fertility care

first_imgAug 17 2018Island Fertility has joined Stony Brook Community Medical, expanding to 23 the number of Stony Brook Medicine’s network of community practices and physicians. The group offers comprehensive and integrated fertility care at Stony Brook Advanced Specialty Care facility in Commack, with a plan to add additional Long Island office locations. Directed by James Stelling, MD, FACOG, HCLD, Island Fertility is a full service fertility practice. It has been a long time dream of Dr. Stelling along with his partner, Bradley Trivax, MD, to build a community practice that can provide all types of fertility treatment in a warm, compassionate atmosphere with state of the art Andrology and Embryology laboratories ready to provide the highest quality and most advanced technology available to patients. Island Fertility has hired a team of highly educated and experienced healthcare professionals to help patients navigate the world of infertility and fertility preservation. Its physicians are board certified reproductive endocrinologists and are the most qualified doctors to diagnose and treat fertility preservation and infertility problems.Related StoriesMost women glad to do genetic testing before IVF, reports surveyBlastocyst transfer linked to higher risk of preterm birth, large-for-gestational-age ratesResearch suggests wisdom is linked to happiness and mental health”There is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to fertility treatment,” said Dr. Stelling. “From artificial insemination procedures like IUI to the latest IVF technology, our focus is on helping families grow with safe and proven solutions that put less stress on the mind and body. We have created Island Fertility to be the ultimate destination for comprehensive fertility treatment on Long Island.””This is truly a wonderful milestone for Stony Brook Medicine,” said Dr. Todd Griffin MD, FACOG, Chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine at Stony Brook Medicine. “We have successfully partnered with two of the leading reproductive specialists on Long Island,” he said, referring to Dr. Stelling and Dr. Trivax. “It is important for patients trying to achieve a highly desired pregnancy, as well as allow for preimplantation genetic testing of embryos, to exclude genetic diseases. It will allow women to freeze eggs for those who want to preserve their fertility in cases of cancer or any other personal life choices. This is a significant milestone, that we can develop this service for women of Long Island.”Source: https://www.stonybrookmedicine.edu/last_img read more

Read more…

ScienceShot Rare Neutrino Morphing Spotted Again

For the fourth time, physicists have spotted a neutrino morphing from a type called a muon neutrino to a type called a tau neutrino. The observation comes from the team working with a massive particle detector called Oscillation Project with Emulsion-tRacking Apparatus (OPERA) in Italy’s subterranean Gran Sasso National Laboratory. OPERA (above) took data from 2008 to 2012 and created quite a sensation in September 2011, when it announced (mistakenly) that neutrinos fired from the European particle physics lab, CERN, 730 kilometers away in Switzerland, appeared to travel faster than light. But OPERA’s main goal was to spot muon-neutrino-to-tau-neutrino conversion, which was predicted by theory. We may not have heard the last of OPERA: Researchers still have data in the can—and they’ve issued a press release with each tau neutrino they’ve seen.See more ScienceShots. read more

Read more…

As US Climate Changes White House Embraces the Science Like Never Before

White House science adviser John Holdren told reporters this morning that the report would “reinforce” all three parts of Obama’s 2013 Climate Action Plan: cutting greenhouse gas emissions, adapting to impacts, and leading internationally. Whether that happens, this is by far the fullest embrace of the assessment process in its tumultuous 24-year history. President Bill Clinton had to fight Congress for years to publish the first national assessment, which came out in 2000. A conservative group sued to stop President George W. Bush from publishing a second one. That administration also scrubbed mention of the 2000 report from official documents, angering climate advocates. An environmental group even sued in 2006 to force Bush to publish the report, then 2 years late; it is supposed to be quadrennial. (Here’s a historical blow-by-blow, by a former federal climate office official.) Insiders consider the second official report, published with little fanfare in 2009 during the early days of Obama’s first term, as a “stillborn” effort.Still, some Washington science policy veterans consider the assessment a rather unique effort for a scientific endeavor, because it includes input from local groups and industries facing possible climate impacts in the future. For instance, scientists and activists involved in the original massive effort that produced the initial 2000 report say the 2014 version also has a strong “bottom-up” flavor. The dozen or so federal agencies that assembled today’s report sponsored some 70 workshops and “listening sessions” over the past 4 years, allowing local groups to not only give input but also shape the report’s form. In addition, small federal grants to state and local nonprofit groups, policymakers, business owners, and academics allowed them to submit formal “input reports” that gave federal officials access to local know-how.The overall message: “We have enough information on climate to act and we know it’s happening,” says climatologist Victoria Keener, among the recipients of the grants. Keener works for the Honolulu-based East-West Center, a nonprofit. As part of her group’s contribution to the NCA, she led a diverse group in 2012 in publishing a 170-page report called Climate Change and Pacific Islands: Indicators and Impacts. (It’s part of a project called the Pacific Islands Regional Climate Assessment, or PIRCA.) Several of PIRCA’s findings, touching on fishing, sea level rise, disaster planning, and much else, “made it into the final report,” she says. So did one of her document’s anecdotes: It relates how Steve Jacobs, the vice president of a landfill in Waianae, Hawaii, used climate prediction information on La Niña in 2010 to drive a decision to spend $300,000 to upgrade his facility’s storm water system. “When the rain hit we were ready,” he says.Keener and others are hopeful that the NCA has catalyzed a process that doesn’t stop with the publication of the massive document today. And to keep the buzz going, a federal climate office has created discussion boards, planned follow-on meetings, and organized local organizing committees to follow up on the report with meaningful climate adaptation and resilience planning.For her part, Keener says that the White House effort has helped drive local regulatory decisions and government interest, including a ruling by a local water board to alter policies in light of predictions of future dry conditions. (See these minutes, page 5.) And Jacobs says he’s expecting more extreme events in the coming years, and has helped lead local efforts to improve planning for hurricanes on the islands. “We believe an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” he says.The White House and its hundreds of scientist allies are hoping that kind of thinking makes the NCA the rare report in Washington—one that has a real-world impact.But some outsiders say the report could have gone further. The World Wildlife Fund’s Nicky Sundt, a former federal official with the U.S. Global Change Research Program, lauds the new report as part of “a permanent process” to spin out subsequent updates and reports as the nation prepares for climate change. But he says the federal advisory committee that oversees the report, which includes both government and nongovernment members, prevented the process from including “some of the most important policy issues. … There’s nothing in the report on budgets, nothing on national security.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The White House has just released its new National Climate Assessment (NCA), and its central scientific message will be familiar to climate scientists and the White House press corps. Climate impacts are already apparent in the United States, they are likely to worsen, and communities should begin factoring climate change into all kinds of decisions. From Hawaii to Maine, from the fishing industry to manufacturing, the report’s 30 chapters emphasize that “evidence of human-induced climate change continues to strengthen and that impacts are increasing across the country.”What’s new, however, is that after putting climate issues somewhat on the back burner prior to the 2012 elections, the Obama administration is now giving a full-throated, multiday endorsement to the 1300-page document. Top White House adviser John Podesta and several climate scientists are briefing the press this morning, and President Barack Obama will be sitting down today with TV meteorologists in a series of interviews pegged to the report. This afternoon, visiting “stakeholders” from around the country will gather for a high-profile White House briefing and listening session, the first of a series planned around the country in the coming months.Today’s assessment is the third official report produced under a 1990 law that instituted the NCA. “Hundreds of the best climate scientists from across the U.S., not just in the public sector but in the private sector as well, have worked over the last 4 years to produce this report,”  Podesta told the White House press corps during yesterday’s daily press briefing. “It will contain a huge amount of practical, usable knowledge that state and local decision-makers can take advantage of as they plan on or for the impacts of climate change.” read more

Read more…

Did you knowingly commit a crime Brain scans could tell

first_img By Warren CornwallMar. 13, 2017 , 3:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Did you knowingly commit a crime? Brain scans could tell The number of years someone spends behind bars can hinge on whether they were clearly aware that they were committing a crime. But how is a judge or jury to know for sure? A new study suggests brain scans can distinguish between hardcore criminal intent and simple reckless behavior, but the approach is far from being ready for the courtroom.The study is unusual because it looks directly at the brains of people while they are engaged in illicit activity, says Liane Young, a Boston College psychologist who was not involved in the work. Earlier research, including work by her, has instead generally looked at the brains of people only observing immoral activity.Researchers led by Read Montague, a neuroscientist at Virginia Tech Carilion Research Insitute in Roanoke and at University College London,  used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which can measure brain activity based on blood flow. They analyzed the brains of 40 people—a mix of men and women mostly in their 20s and 30s—as they went through scenarios that simulated trying to smuggle something through a security checkpoint. In some cases, the people knew for certain they had contraband in a suitcase. In other cases, they chose from between two and five suitcases, with only one containing contraband (and thus they weren’t sure they were carrying contraband). The risk of getting caught also varied based on how many of the 10 security checkpoints had a guard stationed there. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email ZUMA Press Inc/Alamy Stock Photo When people try to sneak something past a security checkpoint, their brains show different activity patterns depending on whether they are certain there is contraband in their suitcase or just know there’s a chance of it, according to a new study.  The results showed distinctive patterns of brain activity for when the person knew for certain the suitcase had contraband and when they only knew there was a chance of it, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. But there was an unexpected twist. Those differing brain patterns only showed up when people were first shown how many security checkpoints were guarded, and then offered the suitcases. In that case, a computer analysis of the fMRI images correctly classified people as knowing or reckless between 71% and 80% of the time.Montague isn’t sure why the results hinged on the order in which the scenario unfolded. It’s possible there is some threshold for the amount of information the brain needed before a distinctive thought process connected to recklessness kicked in, he says. In the laboratory, he says, perhaps the information about both the risk of grabbing a “hot” suitcase and of encountering a security guard “had to be all on board before we could see this difference.”“I see this as a proof of principle that raises more questions than it answers,” says Montague, who notes that his team repeated the experiment several times with the same results. The lawyers working on the study recoiled at the idea that the results depended on the sequencing of the events, because people were engaged in risky behavior no matter the order. “I’m a scientist, so I was like, ‘This is the most interesting part of what we’ve found. We don’t know what to do with this,’” Montague says.But another researcher who has used brain imaging to study criminal behavior questioned whether the differences found in the study really revealed a meaningful difference between the two mental states. Ruben Gur, a psychologist and director of the Brain Behavior Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania’s medical school, says that with just 40 participants, a study may not be able to account for all the variables at play in brain scans. “To me, it proves that when you apply a statistical method on small samples you come up with interesting results, and some that make less sense.” Study author Gideon Yaffe, a philosopher at Yale Law School, notes there are some limitations of the research. It’s not known whether the different brain patterns are confined to this very specific scenario, or would apply more broadly to other situations outside the lab, he says. And he cautions that it’s a very big leap from there to visions of “evil intent detectors” scanning people’s brains. “It was so hard to do this modest thing that it feels very, very far away to be able to do something as grand as that.”A more relevant scenario might be looking at whether the brains of people with certain conditions, such as drug addiction, process risk differently. That research, Yaffe says, might be introduced in court as people wrestle with how much someone really knew as they committed a crime.last_img read more

Read more…

With planetary protection office up for grabs scientists rail against limits to

first_imgIn the 1970s, the Mars Viking landers were sterilized in purpose-built ovens. More recently, says John Rummel, a biologist who was NASA’s planetary protection officer before Conley, JPL has butted heads with the office over the next big mission, the Mars 2020 rover, which will gather rock samples for later retrieval to Earth. JPL is interesting in having the rover target areas with subsurface brines, an activity that would not be allowed with its planned level of cleanliness. Moreover, the planetary protection office has not yet agreed on the efficacy of the techniques JPL will use to sterilize the tubes in which the rover will cache rock cores. If the issues aren’t resolved, Rummel says, the rover could be headed for a bureaucratic “train wreck”.The office, which has always been limited by a small budget and staff, continues to gauge a spacecraft’s “bioburden” based on a classic measure—the number of cultivable microbial spores it carries. “Some of the numbers we’ve been operating on date back decades, and it’d be great to revisit them,” says Sarah Johnson, a planetary scientist at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. She thinks the office should take advantage of two innovations: chemicals that can separate DNA from dead and living cells, and genomic sequencers that can classify the living ones by type. Scientists could then, for example, assess their individual likelihoods of surviving on Mars.As a member of the Curiosity team, Johnson would like to see a change in policy that would allow the rover to sidle up to the wet streaks to give them a close look, even if the drill itself—currently on the fritz since December 2016—could not be used. In their op-ed, Fairén and his colleagues go further, saying NASA should slightly lower its sterilization standards so that robots as clean as Curiosity could explore special regions. Fairén says there is growing evidence that the harsh environment on the martian surface—a combination of frigid temperatures, caustic chemicals and deadly cosmic radiation—would kill Earth’s microbes quickly, especially in the limited numbers that ride along with robots. Even if some survive, he adds, future missions could distinguish between earthly and martian microbes by sequencing their genomes.Rummel, who is now at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, plans to submit a rebuttal to Astrobiology. He disagrees with Fairén’s assumption that contamination from robots won’t spread, but that it would from human exploration. Rummel says Fairén also makes technical mistakes in his paper, like insisting that the 1967 Outer Space Treaty would have to be amended to reflect the planetary protection changes he proposes—it wouldn’t.Whether NASA’s policy might change won’t be clear until a new planetary protection chief is installed, and after the National Academies panel and special regions workshop have weighed in. But some planetary scientists aren’t losing too much sleep over the debate. Jim Kasting, a geoscientist at Pennsylvania State University in State College, says that the soil on Mars has proved to be so lethal that the “chances of finding life in the martian near-surface environment are close to nil.” *Correction, 4 August, 10:52 a.m.: An earlier version of this story gave the wrong affiliation for John Rummel. NASA Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) With planetary protection office up for grabs, scientists rail against limits to Mars exploration Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Since its arrival on Mars in 2012, NASA’s Curiosity rover has zapped and drilled ancient rocks in the hopes of finding evidence for past life. But it may never get a chance to investigate something far more exciting: the possibility that martian microbes exist today. In the coming years, as the rover trundles up the side of Aeolis Mons, it will pass rocks that, seen from orbit, seem to host mysteriously intermittent dark streaks—perhaps marking seasonal water seeps. But NASA’s planetary protection office, charged with keeping earthly microbes from colonizing other bodies, has said it may nix a visit. It fears that Curiosity could contaminate this so-called special region because the rover was not fully sterilized before launch.To Alberto Fairén, a planetary scientist at Cornell University, that makes no sense. Sooner or later humans—biped rovers that can’t be sterilized—will set foot on the planet, hopelessly confounding any hope of finding indigenous life, he and several colleagues argue in an op-ed in press this month in the journal Astrobiology. “We need to investigate Mars’s special regions carefully and fully prior to human missions,” he says.Bureaucratic changes at NASA could create an opening for his view, which some Curiosity team members share. In July, NASA announced, through a blunt job posting, that the planetary protection office was moving out of its longtime home in the science directorate to NASA’s Office of Safety and Mission Assurance in Washington, D.C., a place more accustomed to translating protocols into engineering practice. Cassie Conley, the planetary protection office’s longtime chief, will face competition to keep her job, and she could be replaced by someone with less strict views on sterilization requirements. Meanwhile, by the end of this year, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are expected to complete a head-to-toe examination of how the office works and whether it keeps abreast with current science, and later this year NASA is holding a major workshop that could lead to a redefinition of special regions on Mars, the warm and wet areas that are off-limits for all but the most sterile of spacecraft.  Recurring dark streaks—possible seasonal water seeps—may be off limits for NASA’s Curiosity rover. By Paul VoosenAug. 3, 2017 , 2:00 PM NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona The Viking landers of the 1970s were the only missions to Mars ever to be completely cleaned to the highest standards of planetary protection. They were baked in a purpose-built giant oven, and the cost of doing so is thought to have been roughly 10% of the mission. Ever since then, says Conley, researchers have complained about the office, as if it exists solely to burden them and make their missions impossibly expensive. “People like to have a villain,” she says.The office has clashed in recent years with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, which assembled Curiosity. JPL baked parts of the rover in ovens at 110°C for nearly a week, to sterilize them to a level where the rover could explore special regions. But in 2011, weeks before launch, JPL engineers decided that Curiosity should launch with one of its drill bits mounted on its robotic arm. They opened the already-sterilized bit box, a violation of planetary protection protocols that caused the office to downgrade Curiosity’s sterility. During postmortems, JPL engineers complained about the confusing and vague way the offices presented its requirements.last_img read more

Read more…

Meghan McCain Calls Joy Behar A Bitch

first_imgMcCain was babbling about Trump having a reported 40,000 people at a rally in Orlando, Florida. She told Behar, who often questions why someone who is broken the law in plain sight is still worshiped, “Don’t belittle the crowd. Don’t belittle the enthusiasm. Democrats have a lot to come. A lot of people are enthusiastic, and one of my producers were saying, ‘Why do people love him so much?’ It’s not just they love Trump so much. It’s they hate the same things Trump hates. That’s what’s going on.” Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. SUBSCRIBE 95 Photos Of Black People Marching For Our Lives A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ More By NewsOne Staff Meghan McCain is continuing her legacy of being one of the most unlikable people on television. The 34-year-old hit a new low today by calling 76-year-old Joy Behar a bitch on live television.See Also: Ilhan Omar Reacts To Meghan McCain’s White Tears In addition, Abby Huntsman, who is currently on maternity leave, was supposedly hired by ABC to make Meghan “more comfortable.” Behar allegedly said, “If you want to know what white privilege looks like, this is a great example of it.”SEE ALSO:Meet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s ClothesTrump-Supporting DA Calls ‘Ghetto’ Maxine Waters A ‘Bitch,’ Can’t Believe She Hasn’t Been ShotThis Colin Kaepernick Retweet Says Everything You Need To Know About The NFL Players’ Anthem Grievancecenter_img US-SCHOOL-SHOOTING-PROTEST-POLITICS Behar questioned, “Who? Black people, you mean? Immigrants? Who do they hate?”McCain then whined about her overpaid gig, “You know what, Joy, really, I come here every day open-minded trying to explain it and it’s not a fun job for me. I know you’re angry. I know that you’re angry that Trump is president.”She then accused Behar of yelling at her, which she wasn’t  and McCain babbled, “I’m the sacrificial Republican every day.”Behar said, “Awwww.”McCain when distuging low calling the woman who could be her grandmother a bitch, “Don’t feel bad for me, bitch,” McCain yelled, pointing her finger at Behar as the crowd gasped. “I’m paid to do this. Okay? Don’t feel bad for me.” Sunny Hostin asked to not call each other bitches but McCain tried to clean it up by saying they call each other bitches all the time.Just vile.Watch below:The heat on “The View” is reportedly getting worse every day. As NewsOne reported last week, according to a close source via The Daily Mail, “Whoopi is at her breaking point with Meghan. She’s been trying to hang in there, especially keep the peace with Meghan and Joy, but we all know she’s about to break.” Joy Behar , Meghan McCain , The View Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

Read more…

Physicists create a quantum refrigerator that cools with an absence of light

first_img For decades, atomic physicists have used laser light to slow atoms zinging around in a gas, cooling them to just above absolute zero to study their weird quantum properties. Now, a team of scientists has managed to similarly cool an object—but with the absence of light rather than its presence. The technique, which has never before been experimentally shown, might someday be used to chill the components in microelectronics.In an ordinary laser cooling experiment, physicists shine laser light from opposite directions—up, down, left, right, front, back—on a puff of gas such as rubidium. They tune the lasers precisely, so that if an atom moves toward one of them, it absorbs a photon and gets a gentle push back toward the center. Set it up just right and the light saps away the atoms’ kinetic energy, cooling the gas to a very low temperature.But Pramod Reddy, an applied physicist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, wanted to try cooling without the special properties of laser light. He and colleagues started with a widget made of semiconducting material commonly found in video screens—a light-emitting diode (LED). An LED exploits a quantum mechanical effect to turn electrical energy into light. Roughly speaking, the LED acts like a little ramp for electrons. Apply a voltage in the right direction and it pushes electrons up and over the ramp, like kids on skateboards. As electrons fall over the ramp to a lower energy state, they emit photons. Joseph Xu/Michigan Engineering, Communications & Marketing Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Daniel GaristoFeb. 14, 2019 , 3:50 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) This new device shows that an LED can cool other tiny objects. Physicists create a quantum refrigerator that cools with an absence of light Crucially for the experiment, the LED emits no light when the voltage is reversed, as the electrons cannot go over the ramp in the opposite direction. In fact, reversing the voltage also suppresses the device’s infrared radiation—the broad spectrum of light (including heat) that you see when you look at a hot object through night vision goggles.That effectively makes the device colder—and it means the little thing can work like a microscopic refrigerator, Reddy says. All that’s necessary is to put it close enough to another tiny object, he says. “If you take a hot object and a cold object … you can have a radiative exchange of heat,” Reddy says. To prove that they could use an LED to cool, the scientists placed one just tens of nanometers—the width of a couple hundred atoms—away from a heat-measuring device called a calorimeter. That was close enough to increase the transfer of photons between the two objects, due to a process called quantum tunneling. Essentially, the gap was so small that photons could sometimes hop over it.The cooler LED absorbed more photons from the calorimeter than it gave back to it, wicking heat away from the calorimeter and lowering its temperature by a ten-thousandth of a degree Celsius, Reddy and colleagues report this week in Nature. That’s a small change, but given the tiny size of the LED, it equals an energy flux of 6 watts per square meter. For comparison, the sun provides about 1000 watts per square meter. Reddy and his colleagues believe they could someday increase the cooling flux up to that strength by reducing the gap size and siphoning away the heat that builds up in the LED.The technique probably won’t replace traditional refrigeration techniques or be able to cool materials below temperatures of about 60 K. But it has the potential to someday be used for cooling microelectronics, according to Shanhui Fan, a theoretical physicist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who was not involved with the work. In earlier work, Fan used computer modeling to predict that an LED could have a sizeable cooling effect if placed nanometers from another object. Now, he said, Reddy and his team have realized that idea experimentally.last_img read more

Read more…

National consultation held to strengthen family and community

first_imgShareTweetSharePinParticipants at the consultationA National Consultation for church leaders and key stakeholders specifically to discuss issues impacting families and communities is underway in Dominica.The event, organized by the Ministry of Ecclesiastical Affairs, Family & Gender Affairs, is said to be the culmination of the collective effort of many actors.“This consultation is a mandatory step in strengthening existing relationships with churches, civil society and stakeholders as we work collectively towards key priority areas to ensure that areas like poverty reduction, gender equality, economic empowerment, community empowerment…,” Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Ecclesiastical Affairs, Family & Gender Affairs, Helen Royer said while addressing the opening ceremony held at the Goodwill Parish Hall on Wednesday.And according to her, at the helm of the ministry’s agenda, there is a need for strengthening community structures and community empowerment.Royer said the main goals of the National Consultation are to identify crosscutting issues that affect families and communities, to highlight and identify the various roles of stakeholders in addressing these issues and to explore possible solutions to the issues identified.The objectives through which these goals are expected to be achieved are: to forge closer ties between the Ministry of Ecclesiastical, Family & Gender Affairs and church leaders and other key stakeholders, “to garner the support of church leaders and other key stakeholders in respect to Ecclesiastic and other social issues, to discuss a more strategic approach to unifying families and communities and collectively addressing issues, and to establish a national Ecclesiastical Family Affairs Committee that will lead the effort on the formulation of faith-based policies and contribute to the goals and objectives of the ministry.”Royer went on to say that the religious leaders whom the government met following the change of portfolio, also raised concerns over the lyrical content of songs that the country’s youth are exposed to, the increase in crimes committed by youth, the absence of strong religious programs at some schools and the absence of role models.“Having analyzed the crosscutting issues identified by the various stakeholders of both private and the public service, the ministry believed that the need for a paradigm shift was necessary, especially as we wanted to help families bounce back from difficult situations,” she stated.Royer stated further that the ministry has noted the valuable contributions the churches and other key stakeholders have played in addressing these inequities in society and recognizes their continued critical support in addressing these issues.“However, we are convinced that greater could be done if we work collectively,” she noted.She added, “It is worthy to note that we have made some strides, but we have a long way to go and only through our joint effort, will we be able to reach our fundamental goal.”Royer indicated that in this sense, she considers this consultation of diverse interest groups as taking on a transcendental approach for the future as it seeks citizens input in the issues affecting families and communities.She pointed out that it is a recorded fact that religion and faith play a pivotal role in promoting inclusive growth around the world especially in small Christian societies, “like ours”.“The church faith based organizations, civil society and community can play major roles in either preserving harmful stereotype or stigma or defeating them,” she stated.Royer said it is worthy to note that the government has made some strides, but there’s still a long way to go.“I consider this consultation today a viable interest that take on a transcendental role for the future,” she said.She said the committee made recommendations to address issues relating to schools, crime and violence among others. “Review of the ratio of counselors to students at schools, mom male teachers at the school system, greater involvement of religious persons with the wider community to the issues relating to crime in the society, the need for and building police community relations, encouragement of healthy use of spare time by young people, organization of neighbourhood watch programs and the need for establishment of a Rehab Centre for affected persons among many others,” she noted.Royer hopes that by the end of the day, tangible results will be established more specifically, development of a document with solid recommendations which can be later translated to key policies.Many institutions and individuals contributed in one form or another towards the organization of this consultation.The theme for the consultation is “Resilient Families, Strong Communities”.last_img read more

Read more…

Family of deadly Vegas shooting victim sues gun makers

first_imgMGM Resorts then sued hundreds of victims in a bid to avoid liability. The company has been in settlement talks with the victims and their families. Taking stock of monsoon rain After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Related News MGM sues Las Vegas shooting victims in push to avoid liability “Someone murdered our daughter,” said James Parsons, whose 31-year-old daughter Carrie Parsons was one of 58 people killed when a gunman rained down gunfire from a high-rise hotel. “Someone should be held accountable for that.”A wrongful death lawsuit filed Tuesday targets Colt and seven other gun manufacturers, along with gun shops in Nevada and Utah, arguing their weapons are designed to be easily modified to fire like automatic weapons.“It was a horrifying, agonizing experience and we don’t want this to happen to other families,” Parsons told The Associated Press of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. Advertising Advertising Advertising The lawsuit is the latest case to challenge a federal law shielding gun manufacturers from liability. It charges that gun makers marketed the ability of the AR-15-style weapons to be easily modified to mimic machine guns and fire continuously, violating both a state and federal ban on automatic weapons.A firearms industry group said Wednesday the man who opened fire on a country music concert is the only one responsible for the deaths.Parsons and his wife Ann-Marie argue in the lawsuit that the firearms are “thinly disguised” machine guns that the manufacturers knew could be easily modified, even without the use of a “bump stock,” an attachment used by the Las Vegas gunman that allowed him to fire in rapid succession.The Trump administration banned bump stocks this year, making it illegal to possess them under the same federal laws that prohibit machine guns. “We understand this is an uphill battle,” Ann-Marie Parsons told the AP on Wednesday from their home in suburban Seattle. “But somebody has got to do something because the carnage continues.”“Losing our daughter is the worst thing that ever happened to us. It is hurtful to us every time we see these things happen,” she said.The lawsuit charges the manufacturers showed a “reckless lack of regard for public safety” by advertising the firearms “as military weapons and signaling the weapon’s ability to be simply modified.” It alleges there are dozens of videos online showing people how to install bump stocks.“It was only a question of when – not if – a gunman would take advantage of the ease of modifying AR-15s to fire automatically in order to substantially increase the body count,” the lawsuit states. Family of deadly Vegas shooting victim sues gun makers Carrie Parsons was one of 58 people killed when a gunman rained down gunfire from a high-rise hotel (Chase Stevens/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP)The parents of a young woman killed in the 2017 Las Vegas massacre said Wednesday they blame gun manufacturers for their daughter’s death. Best Of Express Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Why did a gambler kill 58 in 2017 Las Vegas shooting? FBI says it still doesn’t know More Explained By AP |Las Vegas | Published: July 4, 2019 2:10:23 pm Courts have typically rejected lawsuits against gun manufacturers and dealers in other high-profile shooting attacks, citing a 2005 federal law that shields gun makers from liability in most cases when their products are used in crimes.Neither Colt nor any of the other manufacturers immediately responded to requests for comment from The Associated Press. But a national trade association formed on behalf of the firearms industry in 1961 said in an email to AP on Wednesday there is no legal basis for the lawsuit.Lawrence G. Keane, senior vice president and general counsel for the National Shooting Sports Foundation, said the responsibility for the tragedy in Las Vegas “rests with the criminal who committed the violent and reprehensible acts.”“It is wrong to blame the manufacturers of legal, non-defective products lawfully sold for the actions of a madman,” he wrote. “Doing so would be like attempting to hold Ford responsible for a deranged criminal who affixes after-market parts to a Mustang and then misused that car to attack a group of pedestrians.”The attorney for the Parsons family, Joshua Koskoff, is representing relatives of victims of the Newtown school massacre in a similar lawsuit. The Connecticut Supreme Court in March ruled that gun-maker Remington could be sued for the way it marketed an AR-15-style rifle used to kill 20 first graders and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. Remington plans to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.The Las Vegas shooter opened fire on the crowd of 22,000 from his suite in a tower of the Mandalay Bay casino-resort. Police and the FBI say the gunman acted alone and killed himself before officers reached his hotel room.The FBI’s Behavioral Analysis unit later found the shooter sought notoriety in the attack on the open-air concert but cited no “single or clear motivating factor.”The lawsuit is among more than a dozen filed since the Oct. 1, 2017, shooting, though it’s the first to target a gun maker.Victims have sued MGM Resorts International, which operated the concert venue and owns the Mandalay Bay hotel, along with the concert promoter and others. Las Vegas shooting: Victims outraged over MGM’s lawsuit against them Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Read more…

North Korea warns US to quit military drills with South Korea

first_img Top News Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Only 16 days after President Donald Trump set foot in North Korea to try to restart nuclear talks with its leader, North Korea on Tuesday escalated its pressure on the United States to cancel a planned joint military drill with South Korea, warning that it could scuttle efforts to resume dialogue with Washington and even prompt the North to resume nuclear and long-range missile tests.The vaguely worded threats were contained in two separate statements from the North Korean Foreign Ministry on Tuesday that complained about the military drill, called 19-2 Dong Maeng.The North said the planned exercise undermined a mood for dialogue created when its leader, Kim Jong Un, met with Trump at Panmunjom, a village on the inter-Korean border, on June 30. In the hurriedly arranged meeting, the two leaders agreed to restart working-level talks on the terms of denuclearizing North Korea. Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file After the meeting, Trump vowed to halt major joint military drills with South Korea. But the South Korean and U.S. militaries have agreed to hold smaller and reconfigured joint drills, and 19-2 Dong Maeng is one of them.On Tuesday, North Korea said the new drill would “violate the spirit” of the Singapore agreement. It even indicated that its decision to suspend nuclear and ICBM tests was contingent on the absence of joint military drills between the United States and the South.“As the U.S. is unilaterally reneging on its commitments, we are gradually losing our rationale to stay in the commitments we made with the U.S.,” the North said. It noted that neither Washington’s vow to cancel major exercises nor its moratorium on nuclear and missile tests was a legally binding commitment.The Singapore meeting ended with a vague agreement in which Trump committed to build “new” relations and provide security guarantees in return for Kim’s agreement to “work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.” Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed Advertising North Korea warns US to quit military drills with South Korea On Tuesday, North Korea warned that if the joint military drill takes place next month, it “will affect” efforts to resume dialogue. (Representational/File)Written by Choe Sang-Hun Best Of Express By New York Times |Seoul | Published: July 17, 2019 1:12:23 pm Advertising On Tuesday, North Korea warned that if the joint military drill takes place next month, it “will affect” efforts to resume dialogue. At Panmunjom, Trump said dialogue could resume in two or three weeks. But the North on Tuesday appeared to link the resumption of such talks to the cancellation of the military drill.“We will make a decision regarding working-level talks with the United States while watching U.S. moves going forward,” a North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman told the North’s official Korean Central News Agency on Tuesday.For decades, North Korea has campaigned to stop joint military exercises between South Korea and the United States, calling them rehearsals for invasion.In April 2018, Kim announced a halt to his country’s nuclear and intercontinental ballistic missile tests, paving the way for his first meeting with Trump, in Singapore last year. But when Kim and Trump met again in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February, they failed to agree on how to implement their earlier deal.The Hanoi talks collapsed when Kim demanded that Washington lift all major sanctions against his country in return for the dismantling of its nuclear complex in Yongbyon, north of Pyongyang, the capital. Trump insisted on a more comprehensive breaking up of the North’s nuclear programs, including its nuclear weapons and missiles.Despite the failure in Hanoi, both Kim and Trump have often boasted of their mutual “friendship” and willingness to engage in diplomacy. In their meeting on the inter-Korean border last month, they agreed to resume working-level dialogue to help narrow the wide differences between their governments.But such talks have yet to take place. By issuing a vague threat to resume nuclear and missile tests, North Korea appeared to put pressure on Washington even before bilateral talks resumed.The North Korean Foreign Ministry’s statements came hours after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo urged North Korea to change its demands while reconfirming Washington’s goal of achieving the “final fully verifiable denuclearization” of North Korea.“I hope the North Koreans will come to the table with ideas that they didn’t have the first time,” Pompeo said in an interview Monday on “The Sean Hannity Show” on Fox News. More Explained Advertising “We hope we can be a little more creative, too,” Pompeo said. “The president’s mission hasn’t changed: to fully and finally denuclearize North Korea in a way that we can verify.” Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Read more…

Why scientists had trouble predicting Hurricane Michaels rapid intensification

first_img Hurricane Michael roared into Mexico Beach, Florida, on 10 October as the strongest storm ever to strike the Florida Panhandle in terms of wind speed, and the third strongest to make landfall in the continental United States. The storm caused severe damage to several coastal communities, Tyndall Air Force Base, and Florida State University’s Panama City campus. Officials have attributed 18 deaths to the storm and dozens of people have been reported missing.Although National Hurricane Center (NHC) forecasters were able to predict where and when Michael was likely to make landfall several days in advance, the storm’s rapid intensification—jumping from a Category 2 to just shy of a Category 5 in 24 hours—proved tougher to anticipate. NHC defines “rapid intensification” as a storm’s maximum sustained winds increasing by at least 56 kilometers per hour in 24 hours or less. Michael underwent at least three intensification periods on its 5-day march toward the coast.“Predicting a hurricane’s track is relatively straightforward because storms are propelled in one direction or another by the large-scale air currents in the atmosphere,” says Robert Rogers, a meteorologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Hurricane Research Division in Miami, Florida. “We’ve gotten a much better handle on predicting those large-scale currents over the past 20 years.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Why scientists had trouble predicting Hurricane Michael’s rapid intensification Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images Emailcenter_img By Frankie SchembriOct. 15, 2018 , 4:05 PM Hurricane Michael, whose rapid intensification proved difficult to forecast, made landfall on 10 October near Mexico Beach, Florida. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) But when it comes to predicting changes to a storm’s intensity, the underlying physics becomes much more complicated, says Kerry Emanuel, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. That’s because hurricanes are complex, massive rotating heat engines, Emanuel says, fueled by a favorable combination of warm ocean water, moist air, and consistent atmospheric winds.Hurricanes have a theoretical limit on how intense they can become in terms of wind speed, he notes, but it is never reached because storms are derailed by one of the trio of factors mentioned above. For example, storms lose fuel when they travel over cooler water or onto land. And inconsistent atmospheric winds can be an obstacle to intensification. For instance, when “wind speed varies with height,” Emanuel says, “you get what’s known as wind shear. This can tip over the core of the hurricane and allow dry air to invade, which disrupts the storm like tossing water on a fire.”Scientists now have an arsenal of tools—including piloted and robotic aircraft that NOAA flies alongside storms—that collect data on a host of variables that can be incorporated into weather models, and help researchers estimate when a hurricane will rev up. Such data help reveal the larger physical processes at play, Rogers says. But there is still considerable work to do in understanding finer-scale microprocesses that also dictate how quickly a hurricane will intensify. “Thunderstorm formation, raindrop formation, ice particle formation, all these things are happening inside each hurricane and can affect its intensity,” he says. “These micro-level processes can be very challenging to model.”Researchers also know little about a crucial zone where the ocean and atmosphere meet. Most of a hurricane’s heat flux takes place in this transitional layer, where water and air mix into a sort of emulsion. “It’s nearly impossible to get samples from this layer, and it’s tricky to simulate this kind of condition in the lab to study it,” Emanuel says.Still, researchers are making some progress on improving intensity forecasts. More data are always helpful, Rogers says, and NOAA was able to collect a “substantial amount” from Hurricane Michael. Rogers’s team is also working on developing robust unmanned aircraft to fly directly into storms and collect higher quality data about microprocesses. Several teams are also developing probes and submersibles to monitor the water column during hurricanes—including the international Argo program that distributes instrumented floats that drift with currents and periodically sink below the surface.Meteorologists are also keeping a close eye on climate change, as warmer oceans and rising sea levels could complicate hurricane intensity predictions. “If you put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and warm the climate, the maximum speed limit for hurricane goes up,” Emanuel says. “The rate at which hurricanes can intensify also increases, meaning you could have storms intensify much faster than Michael.” If storms rev up more quickly, authorities will have less time to coordinate evacuation efforts, which could prove both deadly and expensive. “It’s a forecaster’s worst nightmare,” Emanuel says, “to go to bed one evening with a tropical storm somewhere in the Gulf of Mexico and wake up the next morning with a Category-4 storm just about to make landfall.”last_img read more

Read more…

Geographical range of vectorborne diseases expands rapidly shows research

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 15 2019New research presented at this year’s European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (13-16 April) shows that the geographical range of vector-borne diseases such as chikungunya, dengue fever, leishmaniasis, and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is expanding rapidly.Spurred on by climate change and international travel and trade, vector-borne disease outbreaks are set to increase across much of Europe over the next few decades–and not just in the temperate countries around the Mediterranean. Even previously unaffected areas in higher latitudes and altitudes, including some parts of northern Europe, could see an increase in outbreaks unless action is taken to improve surveillance and data sharing, and to monitor environmental and climatic precursors to outbreaks, alongside other preventive measures.”Climate change is not the only or even the main factor driving the increase in vector-borne diseases across Europe, but it is one of many factors alongside globalization, socioeconomic development, urbanization, and widespread land-use change which need to be addressed to limit the importation and spread of these diseases”, says Professor Jan Semenza from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden.”The stark reality is that longer hot seasons will enlarge the seasonal window for the potential spread of vector-borne diseases and favor larger outbreaks”, says Dr Giovanni Rezza, Director of the Department of Infectious Diseases at the Istituto Superiore di Sanitá in Rome, Italy. “We must be prepared to deal with these tropical infections. Lessons from recent outbreaks of West Nile virus in North America and chikungunya in the Caribbean and Italy highlight the importance of assessing future vector-borne disease risks and preparing contingencies for future outbreaks.”However, the authors caution, that given the complicated interplay between multiple drivers (eg, warming temperatures and international travel), weather sensitive pathogens, and climate-change adaption, projecting the future burden of disease is difficult.Global warming has allowed mosquitoes, ticks and other disease-carrying insects to proliferate, adapt to different seasons, and invade new territories across Europe over the past decade–with accompanying outbreaks of dengue in France and Croatia, malaria in Greece, West Nile Fever in Southeast Europe, and chikungunya virus in Italy and France.Related StoriesGM fungus kills 99% of mosquitoes in Malaria-endemic region of AfricaNew study suggests bacteria-loaded mosquitoes may halt spread of Dengue feverMalaria free status for Algeria and ArgentinaWorryingly, the authors say, this might only be the tip of the iceberg. “Mediterranean Europe is now a part-time tropical region, where competent vectors like the Tiger mosquito are already established”, says Dr Rezza.Hotter and wetter weather could provide ideal conditions for the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which spreads the viruses that cause dengue and chikungunya, to breed and expand across large parts of Europe including the south and east of the UK and central Europe.Previously dengue transmission was largely confined to tropical and subtropical regions because freezing temperatures kill the mosquito’s larvae and eggs, but longer hot seasons could enable A albopictus to survive and spread across much of Europe within decades, researchers say.The European climate is already suitable for the transmission of Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis which are spread by ticks (primarily Ixodes ricinus)–with an estimated 65,000 cases of Lyme borreliosis a year in the European Union, and a 400% rise in reported cases of TBE in European endemic areas over the past 30 years (partly due to enhanced surveillance and diagnosis).In the future, warmer winter temperatures, longer growing seasons, and earlier hotter summers could make conditions more favorable for ticks and increase the range of deer host populations, say the authors. Climate change models indicate that by 2040-2060, there could be a 3.8% growth in the habitat of Ixodes ricinus in Europe, with Scandinavia anticipated to be most at risk.Moreover, improved climate conditions for sandflies–the main carrier of Leishmaniasis–could extend their geographical spread to southern parts of the UK, France, and Germany by the end of the 2060s.”Given the ongoing spread of invasive mosquitoes and other vectors across Europe, we must anticipate outbreaks and move to intervene early”, says Professor Semenza. “Public health agencies need to improve surveillance, for example through early warning systems, increase awareness of the potential risks among healthcare workers and the general public, as well as adopt innovative control strategies such as community interventions.”Source: https://www.escmid.org/last_img read more

Read more…

ACR and Arthritis Foundation release two guidelines on juvenile idiopathic arthritis

first_img“These recommendations highlight the importance of prompt and effective treatment for children with JIA and polyarthritis, sacroiliitis, and enthesitis,” said Sarah Ringold, MD, MS, a pediatric rheumatologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital and the principal investigator on this guideline. “They also support relatively tight disease control, with inactive disease as the goal. While it is anticipated that these recommendations will lead to improved outcomes for children with JIA and these phenotypes, they also emphasize the ongoing need to generate high-quality data about treatment effectiveness in JIA.”As noted, JIA can impair a child’s quality of life–especially when extra-articular manifestations occur. A common manifestation is uveitis, which can be a chronic or acute disease. Chronic anterior uveitis (CAU) develops in 10-20 percent of children with JIA, is usually asymptomatic, and there is rarely external evidence of inflammation. On the other hand, acute anterior uveitis (AAU) is a distinctly different form of uveitis and typically occurs in children with spondyloarthritis (i.e., those with enthesitis related or psoriatic arthritis).Related StoriesSnapshot of chikungunya could help find new ways to prevent or treat viral arthritisSurvey: More than 50% of people with arthritis have tried medical marijuana or CBDStudy shows link between BMI and disease severity in psoriatic arthritisImportant recommendations from the JIA-associated uveitis guideline include: “Prevention of sight-threatening complications from uveitis is most important. It is crucial that children with JIA undergo scheduled ophthalmology screening to detect uveitis early since children are usually asymptomatic,” said Sheila T. Angeles-Han, MD, MSc, a rheumatologist at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and principal investigator for this guideline.The JIA guidelines were developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, which provides rigorous standards for judging the quality of the literature available and assigns strengths to the recommendations that are largely based on the quality of the available evidence. The guideline process also included significant input from patients and parents, which was made possible through the ACR and AF partnership. “We are proud to have been involved in this work and to witness the important contributions of the patient and parent partners,” said M. Suz Schrandt, JD, who serves as the director of patient engagement for AF. “Their lived experiences truly helped to guide the project.”Although the quality of evidence was low or very low and most recommendations were therefore conditional for both, these guidelines fill an important clinical gap in the care of children with JIA, including non-systemic polyarthritis, sacroilitis and enthesitis, and JIA-associated uveitis, and may be updated as better evidence becomes available. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 30 2019Today, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), in partnership with the Arthritis Foundation (AF), released two guidelines on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). One guideline aims to provide therapeutic approaches for non-systemic polyarthritis, sacroilitis and enthesitis; and the other focuses on the screening, monitoring and treatment of JIA with associated uveitis.Juvenile arthritis (JA) is a common, chronic childhood disease that affects nearly 300,000 children in the United States. According to the AF, juvenile arthritis is not a disease in itself, but is an umbrella term used to describe the autoimmune and inflammatory conditions or pediatric rheumatic diseases, like JIA, that can develop in children younger than 16.With JIA, the term idiopathic means “of unknown origin.” All forms of JIA are associated with a decreased health-related quality of life, a risk for permanent joint damage, and the likelihood that the disease may persist into adulthood.A few of the recommendations from the JIA polyarthritis guideline include: A strong recommendation to get ophthalmologic monitoring within one month after each change of topical glucocorticoids rather than monitoring less frequently for children and adolescents with controlled uveitis who are tapering or discontinuing topical glucocorticoids. A conditional recommendation to start methotrexate and a monoclonal antibody TNFi immediately rather than methotrexate as a monotherapy in children and adolescents with severe, active CAU and sight-threating complications. A strong recommendation for education regarding the warning signs of AAU for the purpose of decreasing delay in treatment, duration of symptoms, or complications of iritis for children and adolescents with spondyloarthritis.center_img Conditional recommendations that NSAIDs and intraarticular glucocorticoids should each be used as adjunct therapy. A strong recommendation against adding chronic low-dose glucocorticoid, regardless of risk factors or disease activity. A conditional recommendation to get physical therapy and/or occupational therapy for children and adolescents with JIA and polyarthritis who have, or are at risk for, functional limitations. Source:https://www.rheumatology.org/last_img read more

Read more…

Antidepressant treatment leads to impaired empathy regarding perception of pain

first_imgThe lowered emotional impact of negative events in a social context possibly allows patients to recover more easily. Nevertheless, the actual impact of reduced empathy on patients’ social behavior remains to be explored.” Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 18 2019Antidepressant treatment, not only depression per se, can lead to reductions in behavioral and neural responses to pain empathyDepression is a disorder that often comes along with strong impairments of social functioning. Until recently, researchers assumed that acute episodes of depression also impair empathy, an essential skill for successful social interactions and understanding others. However, previous research had been mostly carried out in groups of patients who were on antidepressant medication. Novel insights of an interdisciplinary collaboration involving social neuroscientists, neuroimaging experts, and psychiatrists from the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna show that antidepressant treatment can lead to impaired empathy regarding perception of pain, and not just the state of depression itself. The results of this study have been published in the scientific journal Translational Psychiatry.Related StoriesSocial media use and television viewing linked to rise in adolescent depressive symptomsPerinatal depression screenings may overlook women having suicidal ideationRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaAn interdisciplinary research team jointly led by Prof. Claus Lamm (Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods, University of Vienna), Prof. Rupert Lanzenberger (Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna) and Prof. Christian Windischberger (Center for Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Medical University of Vienna) set out to disentangle effects of acute depressive episodes and antidepressant treatment on empathy. The research has been performed within the research cluster “Multimodal Neuroimaging in Clinical Neurosciences”, an intramural research initiative aimed at translational collaborations between researchers at the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna. The researchers recruited unmedicated patients with acute depression, and tested their empathic responses to the pain of others twice: first, during an acute depressive episode, i.e., before they had received any medication. Second, after three months of psychopharmacological treatment with antidepressants (mostly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors).In both sessions, patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while watching videos of people undergoing painful medical procedures. Their brain activity and self-reported empathy were compared to those of a group of healthy controls. Before treatment, patients and controls responded in a comparable way. After three months of antidepressant treatment, the research revealed relevant differences: patients reported their level of empathy to be lower, and brain activation was reduced in areas previously associated with empathy.First author Markus Rütgen underlines that reduced empathic responses were not caused by a general dampening of negative emotions: Source:University of viennaJournal reference:Rütgen, M. et al. (2019) Antidepressant treatment, not depression, leads to reductions in behavioral and neural responses to pain empathy. Translational Psychiatry. doi.org/10.1038/s41398-019-0496-4last_img read more

Read more…

Infrared camera to ensure highquality 3D reproducibility of parts

first_img Explore further Citation: Infrared camera to ensure high-quality 3-D reproducibility of parts (2018, September 25) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-infrared-camera-high-quality-d.html One of the largest challenges facing the 3-D printing industry is how to ensure high-quality reproducibility of parts. Without better insights into how to detect and stop defects, the technology has limitations when producing commodity parts.That much-needed insight is at industrial designers’ fingertips now, thanks to a new tool available to industry and researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory. The installation of an infrared camera to the high-energy X-ray source at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, allows researchers to measure thermal signatures across surfaces in real time.Argonne was the first U.S. national laboratory to integrate a metal 3-D printing apparatus into a beamline, or photon path, for X-ray diagnostics. It is also the only national laboratory that can view the metal powder melting within the so-called “melt pool” area in less than a nanosecond. Adding the high-speed infrared camera to a synchrotron beamline is another first, and enables researchers to more closely replicate the deposition processes that occur on a real manufacturing floor.The combined diagnosis tools let industry and researchers capture X-ray images at 1,000,000 frames per second and thermal images at 100,000 frames per second during the 3-D printing processes. This creates movies of the formation of key defects caused by melt pool instability, powder spatter ejection and inappropriate scan strategy. The addition of a new infrared camera at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source narrows the gap between basic and applied research in additive manufacturing. Together, infrared and X-ray imaging can help scientists better understand the 3-D printing process. Credit: Argonne National Laboratory With a new infrared camera, Argonne researchers can delve into the detailed dynamics of 3-D printing by measuring thermal signatures across surfaces in real time. Credit: Shutterstock / MarinaGrigorivna Complementary imagingUsed side by side with X-ray microscopy, high-speed thermal imaging can deliver novel insights into how much and how fast different regions in the part heat up and cool down during the entire build, which involves millions of laser line scans. These insights can be used to reduce variations in the design of parts, and improve the efficiency of additive manufacturing for consumer products, defense, medicine, automotive and many other field applications. “Infrared and X-ray imaging complement each other,” said Argonne physicist Tao Sun. “From one side you have the X-rays penetrating the sample to help you see the microstructures without any thermal information, while on the other you have the infrared camera capturing many thermal signatures associated.”One way the infrared camera augments X-ray imaging is by helping visualize the formation of plumes of vaporized powder, which form as the laser hits and moves across the powder. These plumes, high in heat, can disrupt the performance of the laser.These plumes cannot be seen using X-rays alone due to the vaporized state of the particles, but are captured by infrared light. Alongside measurements taken by X-rays, such data, as well as other important parameters including heating and cooling rates, can feed into models of 3-D printing to improve their accuracy and speed.Bridging basic and applied science Provided by US Department of Energy The Advanced Photon Source generates high-energy X-rays that show 3-D printing in near real time. Credit: Argonne National Laboratory This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Another key benefit of infrared cameras is their ability to be integrated into additive manufacturing systems, bringing the fundamental research done at the APS closer to real-world users.Sun and Greco see a future where the users of additive manufacturing systems could attach infrared cameras to their machines to leverage insights found from coupling X-ray and infrared imaging, such as a thermal signature (found through infrared imaging) correlated with the formation of a defect (captured through X-ray imaging). If found, users could single out when defects were forming in their own systems based on a given signature, and take preemptive measure to mitigate or fix the problem.Such potential applications are far out in the future, Sun said, but exemplify the potential benefits to integrating both imaging techniques.”Not everyone is lucky enough to have access to a powerful X-ray light source like the APS, so if we can find ways to deliver information and tap into tools that most people have access to, like thermal cameras, we can have an even greater impact on the field,” he said.The infrared camera is located at the Advanced Photon Source’s 32-ID-B beamline. The IR camera was funded through an LDRD program as part of Argonne’s Manufacturing Science and Engineering Program. See a video about this new technology here. Pictures of success in 3-D printinglast_img read more

Read more…

Nokia Q4 profit up as operators switching to 5G networks

first_imgNokia has reported increased fourth-quarter earnings on the back of grown orders from telecom operators of new-generation mobile networks that are expected to be rolled out commercially this year. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Espoo, Finland-based company said Thursday that its net profit for the October-December period was 741 million euros ($852 million), against 716 million euros a year earlier. Sales were up 3 percent at 6.9 billion euros.Nokia CEO Rajeev Suri said the company’s performance is expected to improve further this year as “a fast and meaningful shift” into the new 5G networks takes place.He said particularly the latter part of 2019 is expected to be “robust” with operators worldwide updating their existing networks and technology. Nokia cuts more jobs as high-speed network deals come slowly Explore further Citation: Nokia Q4 profit up as operators switching to 5G networks (2019, January 31) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-nokia-q4-profit-5g-networks.html © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read more…

Boeing antistall system was activated in Ethiopia crash source

first_imgThe two planes’ flight recorders provided the strongest indication yet that an anti-stall system malfunctioned in both the Ethiopian Airlines crash of March 10, 2019—the aftermath of which is seen here—and Lion Air’s 2018 crash in Indonesia ‘MCAS was the problem’The family of 31-year-old Jackson Musoni, a Rwandan citizen who died in the Ethiopian Airlines accident, filed a lawsuit against Boeing on Thursday in a court in Chicago, where the company has its corporate headquarters. The suit accuses the aircraft manufacturer of designing a defective system.The MCAS, which lowers the aircraft’s nose if it detects a stall or loss of airspeed, was developed specifically for the 737 MAX, which has heavier engines than its predecessor, creating aerodynamic issues.The initial investigation into the October Lion Air crash in Indonesia, which killed all 189 people on board, found that an “angle of attack” (AOA) sensor failed but continued to transmit erroneous information to the MCAS.The pilot tried repeatedly to regain control and pull the nose up, but the plane crashed into the ocean.The flight track of the doomed Ethiopia Airlines flight, which also crashed minutes after takeoff, “was very similar to Lion Air (indicating) there was very possibly a link between the two flights,” FAA acting chief Daniel Elwell told Congress this week. Citation: Boeing anti-stall system was activated in Ethiopia crash: source (2019, March 29) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-boeing-mcas-anti-stall-ethiopia-source.html Indonesian air safety officials Soerjanto Tjahjono (R), and Nurcahyo briefed journalists in Jakarta during a March 21, 2019 news conference about the Lion Air crash in 2018 The information is among the preliminary findings from the analysis of the “black boxes” retrieved from Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, which crashed southeast of Addis Ababa on March 10, killing 157 people, the source told AFP on condition of anonymity. The information retrieved from the plane’s voice and data recorders was presented Thursday to US authorities, including the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the source said.However, the source said the investigation is still underway and the findings are not yet definitive.The information was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.Boeing and the FAA declined to comment to AFP.Ethiopian authorities have promised to submit the preliminary report on Flight 302 by mid-April but have already said that there are “clear similarities” between the two Max 8 crashes.It was yet another blow to aviation giant Boeing, which just this week unveiled a fix to the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) that Boeing designed to prevent stalls in its new plane.The aviation company has tried to restore its battered reputation, even while continuing to insist that the MAX is safe. © 2019 AFP Acting FAA administrator Daniel Elwell, seen here testifying before a Senate committee on March 27, 2019, has insisted that the certification of Boeing’s Max 8 airplanes was “detailed and thorough” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Boeing ‘finalizing’ anti-stall update after Ethiopia crash The FAA grounded the MAX fleet worldwide, but not until two days after most countries had done so.That delay, along with an FAA policy allowing Boeing to certify some of its own safety features, has raised questions about whether regulators are too close to the industry. Boeing on the defenseElwell denied the agency was lax in its oversight, saying, “The certification process was detailed and thorough.”He also seemed to cast doubt on the MCAS as the clear culprit, saying that data collected from 57,000 flights in the US since the MAX was introduced in 2017 revealed not a single reported MCAS malfunction.However, Steven Marks, the lawyer for Jackson Musoni’s family, said information from the recent tragedies, as well as pilot reports, “made it crystal clear that the cause of these two crashes are the same.””There’s no question that MCAS was the problem” and that pilots were not aware of the system, he told AFP.US pilots complained after the Lion Air crash that they had not been fully briefed on the system.Musoni was among at least 22 United Nations employees killed in the Ethiopian crash.Boeing also declined to comment on the lawsuit, but this week unveiled changes to the MCAS system that will be installed worldwide, once the FAA approves. Among the changes, long in the works, the MCAS will no longer repeatedly make corrections when the pilot tries to regain control, and the company will install a warning feature—at no cost—to alert pilots when the left and right AOA sensors are out of sync.The company also is revising pilot training, including for those already certified on the 737, to provide “enhanced understanding of the 737 MAX” flight system and crew procedures. Boeing’s MCAS anti-stall system, which was implicated in the October crash of a 737 MAX 8 airliner in Indonesia, was also activated shortly before a recent accident in Ethiopia, a source with knowledge of the investigation said Friday.last_img read more

Read more…